Chronic Low Back Pain and Yellow Flags, Why, How and What Physiotherapists Do: Part 2 Discussion

Discussion The literature review overviews the various different methods currently used in practice to give an overview of the background to which these decisions are being made. Why these physiotherapists practice The literature review showed the breadth of approaches available to clinicians and informed the interview process. This research sheds some light on how and why clinicians choose which of these interventions to use. The central theoretical code identified was the physiotherapists looked to do what was best for the patient from a variety of motivations. This is similar to previous...

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Chronic Low Back Pain and Yellow Flags: Interview Results; Why, How and What Physiotherapists Do

Below are the results of my MSc research in to how different physiotherapists manage chronic low back pain patients with yellow flags. I’ve spared you the details of the methodology but if a few people are interested I will share them as well. Essentially I conducted interviews with six different physiotherapists on how they would manage a chronic low back pain patient with yellow flags using a vignette. These interviews were transcribed and analysed and the results are below.   Results The theoretical, selective and open codes were organised in to a coding tree as shown in appendix 8...

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Review: Chronic Low Back Pain And Yellow Flags, What Treatments Are Effective?

1. Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is usually defined as pain localised below the costal margin (ribs) and above the inferior gluteal folds (buttock crease). It is the leading cause of disability worldwide and is becoming increasingly prevalent (Harkness et al. 2005, Hoy et al. 2012, Vos et al. 2012). Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is variously defined as lasting longer than 7-12 weeks, to 3 months (Anderrson 1999, Frymoyer 1988). LBP is typically classified as “specific” or “non-specific”. Specific LBP refers to symptoms caused by specific pathophysiologic causes, such as hernia nucleus, infection,...

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C-Reactive Protein, Chronic Low Back Pain and, Diet and Lifestyle

Abstract C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is best known as an acute phase protein and is typically assessed in most general blood work. High sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) may be a useful clinical marker of chronic inflammatory states in musculoskeletal conditions. It appears that it is raised in inflammatory chronic low back pain (CLBP) and associated with reduced pain thresholds, weakness and reduced function. It is also possible CRP could contribute towards the development and maintenance of CLBP by activating the complement system which increases peripheral nociception. Diet and lifestyle factors can promote...

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The Tripod Position

Left foot and right arm support. The right leg and left arm can support or move in to a stepping forward pattern.                   This position is the tripod is a variation of a static lunge taught as part of the Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilisation programme according to Pavel Kolar, and correlates to the 8-9 month developmental age. The right arm and left foot are supporting and the left arm and right leg are stepping forward. The clinician can support the left knee and foot centration, trunk centration and uprighting of the spine. The most common...

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